media darling

a personal record of how different forms of media and their content affect me (a college student)

A New Little Nugget in the Blogging World October 28, 2008

Filed under: blogging — katie @ 9:16 am
Tags: , ,

Have you ever heard of JuicyCampus.com? Well, it has the potential to ruin your life. Juicy Campus is a new blog, and a place for students at many colleges and universities to write anything they want about their school, anonymously. There are seriously degrading things written about people, that are often untrue, and sadly I actually personally know many people who have been “blogged” about on the site. Of course, people say they could care less and wouldn’t give Juicy Campus two seconds of their time, but once you go onto the Web site, it’s nearly impossible not to click on the thread titled, “Who Gives the Best Dome on Campus?” It’s terrible, but people are going to believe the defamatory things written, simply because it’s on the Internet. Most of the stuff on the site is about the “Greek life” on campus, but it is open for literally any subject, place, class or person to be discussed, and has gotten completely out-of-control.

This is upsetting to me because I feel that this site goes against everything blogging is intended for. It’s sad that a seemingly mature community, who is here to get a good education, would take the time to use this site to intentionally hurt others. We might as well go back to 7th grade.

The creators of Juicy Campus have thought this through, and cannot be sued for their host of information, because everything is 100 percent anonymous. You also have to agree to terms and conditions before entering, so it would be impossible to sue anyone who posted something unless someone knew who they were.

There have been recent news articles and many blogs written in response to Juicy Campus, and the upset it’s causing. CNN’s Web site’s article about Juicy Campus said, “It was founded by a Duke alum, a former frat house president who has gone to lengths to keep his identity secret.”

The article says, “Juicy Campus and similar Web sites are protected under the Communications Decency Act of 1996. The Act aims to shield Web publishers from liability for libelous comments posted by third parties. The section states ‘no provider or user of an interactive computer service shall be treated as the publisher or speaker of any information provided by another information content provider.'”

So, basically any coward who has something mean to say about someone they don’t like, is able to get out their steam in a completely public way and use the Communication Decency Act of 1996 to hide behind and make them feel like less of a scum bag.

Hopefully either this site will be shut down for taking gossip and rumors way too far, or people will soon realize the damage they are doing to others, and even to themselves. This is an extremely immature and unfortunate forum that intelligent people are taking advantage of and hurting others with.

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while we’re on the subject of media effects… August 28, 2008

Being that this is my first post on my first blog, and that this blog happens to be about my reactions to current day media and how different forms of media personally affect me, it seems appropriate to react to the realm of blogging, considering it is a major media form of today. It amazes me how popular blogging has become, because I used to consider blogs as a place for people to rant about their problems or share their personal experiences with anyone who had the time of day to read them. I have come to learn, however, that many bloggers have very reputable personalities and have interesting and credible information to share about their topics of interest. Blogging has become an undeniable resource for news, information, and communication – the very definition of what mass media is.

Bloggers have had quite the impact on the journalism community now that the Internet has become so prominent – which is interesting but also makes for uneasy feelings as a student hoping to go into the field of journalism one day. Shelly Sindland, a political correspondent for Fox 61 and TV Host of ‘Beyond the Headlines‘ spoke with me about blogging and political journalism for a project I had for my Online Journalism class. She said that although she doesn’t feel threatened by the “pajama journalists,” rookie journalists should feel somewhat uneasy about their rising status and importance. Although I am warming up to blogging, this advice from a professional keeps my reactions to blogging lukewarm. It’s hard to say what the future will hold, but my feelings are that if blogging continues gaining popularity, as I’m confident it will, other news sources will become back-up.

Blogging has become so powerful that it has even come to weigh outcomes for politicians and companies. Sindland talked to me about what an impact blogging had on the Lieberman-Lamont race and said that Lamont was successful because of the support system he had from his blogging community.

Something I found interesting on wikipedia, is that many bloggers differentiate themselves from the mainstream media. I really consider blogging to have become a mainstream form of media because it is a direct form of communication to the masses.